Using Microbe Blast as a Antimicrobial Disinfectant

  • Independently-proven 99.99% effective at killing viruses, bacteria, and fungi.*
  • All-Natural • Non-Toxic • Child & Pet Safe
  • Incredibly cost-effective. One quart makes 32 ready-use quarts (8 gallons) for as little as $6.52 per ready-use quart ($12.50 per gallon).

*Per studies conducted at the University of Louisville Hospital Microbiology Laboratory which concluded, "exposure to the Microbe Blast compound led to a 100% killing over time, indicating that this substance acts more like a disinfectant than an antibiotic. The mechanism of action is yet to be determined."

 

Purchasing Options    Suggested Uses    FAQ   Independent Study

 


Mixing Directions

ALWAYS DILUTE BEFORE USE. Use clean containers and water.

  • To make 1 pint, add 15 ounces water followed by ½ ounce Microbe Blast.
  • To make 1 quart, add 31 ounces water followed by 1 ounce Microbe Blast.
  • To make 1 gallon, add 124 ounces water followed by 4 ounces Microbe Blast.
  • Air drying provides up to 48 hours of antimicrobial protection.

Suggested Uses

Hand Sanitizer: 
Thoroughly apply to hands and fingers. Use as needed; air dry.

Personal Protection Equipment and Clothing
Spray on gloves, masks, gowns, personal clothing; air dry.

Hard Surfaces
Metal, plastic, bathroom surfaces, counter tops, nightstands, soles of shoes, shower curtains, etc; air dry.

Floors
Use for mopping, spills, spot messes from pets, and carpets. Do not use on wood, may affect finish; air dry.

Laundry
Use alone or with detergent; bleach optional. Add 1 to 4 ounces of Microbe Blast per load depending on load size (small to large). Do not overuse, sudsing occurs.

 

Bed Bugs Treatment Use Instructions:

Bed Bug Mixing Directions

To make 1 quart of ready-use spray:

  1. Add 30 ounces of hot, clean water to 1 quart spray bottle.
  2. Add 2 ounces of Microbe Blast to the hot water (hot water helps attract the bugs to the solution).
  3. Add Essential Oils if desired -- approximately 10 drops per quart. Helpful oils: thyme, peppermint, clove, lemon-grass, lavender.
  4. Allow the solution to air dry after applied.


Helpful Bed Bugs Treatment Tips

  • Use preventatively when traveling or when guests arrive. Bed bugs are famous for hitch hiking and hiding. Five Star hotels and cheap motels are possible nesting areas and transfer stations.
  • Luggage, shoes and clothing used while traveling should be treated when traveling and before entering home.
  • Use on inside and outside of luggage, shoes, etc. Air dry.
  • Spray solution thoroughly on and around all beds and bedding.
  • Apply to carpets, crevices, baseboards, picture frames, and all furniture except finished wood.
  • Vacuum carpets well. Steam clean if needed. Use 6-8 ounces of Microbe Blast per gallon of diluted carpet cleaning solution.
  • Use in laundry with hot water. Add 1-3 ounces of Microbe Blast to laundry water. Use according to load size. Sudsing may occur if over-used.
  • Bed bugs are attracted to heat, use of hot water when possible helps with protocols.
  • Treat in low light when possible. Bed Bugs are active in the dark. Spray solution in the evening and then darken room, though any time is OK.
  • Repeat treatment in 24 hours or as needed. Bed bugs can live without feeding for up to about 1 year. Stay vigilant.

 

FAQ

What's the best way to use Microbe Blast on my hands?

Spray hands from wrist to finger nails. Thoroughly spread over all skin and under fingernails. Germs love to populate under fingernails. Allow to air dry for best results. Use as needed.


Is color change in the liquid concentrate normal?

Yes, color variation is normal in Microbe Blast. Color may vary from clear to a red-orange. With age, the color will also change and the solution may change in viscosity, but the solution remains equally effective.


What's your return policy?

We guarantee your complete product satisfaction or we'll refund your entire purchase amount. Please inform us within 30 days of purchase if you are unhappy with Microbe Blast's products for a full refund, excluding shipping cost.


Can I use on my child’s furniture and clothing?

Yes. Microbe Blast is non-toxic and non-staining. Use caution if using on clothing that a person is wearing. Do not spray into the eyes or you may experience a mild stinging sensation for a short time period. If this occurs, simply flush with clean water.


Can Microbe Blast be sprayed on my masks?

Yes. Spray Microbe Blast onto any mask and allow to air dry before and after use.


Is Microbe Blast safe for children?

Yes. Microbe Blast is non-toxic and child-safe. Avoid contact with eyes and teach children how to properly use Microbe Blast.


What's the shelf life?

Microbe Blast does not have an expiration date. Our unique all-natural formula is best stored at room temperature, although it can withstand temperature swings.


How precise do I need to be when mixing in water?

Although perfection is not required, do try your best to get as close to the suggested ratio as possible. Avoid over-diluting.


How do I use Microbe Blast in my car?

Use Microbe Blast diluted to disinfect surfaces. Spray onto a cloth and wipe, or spray directly onto surface. Avoid areas that should not get wet, such as electronics; consider spraying a cloth lightly and gently wiping electronic areas that do not contain exposed wires. Bio-Pana will not stain cloth or leather.


 

Independent Study

university logo

University of Louisville: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

These studies were conducted at the University of Louisville Hospital Microbiology Laboratory. The University of Louisville Hospital is a full service Level I Trauma Center offering an array of preventative, diagnostic and treatment services in affiliation with the University of Louisville School of Medicine. The microbiology laboratory is a full service facility capable of providing a wide variety of clinical studies on bacteria, fungi and viruses. The laboratory is accredited by the College of American Pathologists and certified by CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments). In association with theSchool of Medicine’s Department of pathology, the Microbiology Laboratory Conducts numerous studies related to new methods, technology evaluations, and clinical drug studies.

All studies are conducted under the direction of James W. Snyder, Ph.D. Dr Snyder is the Chief of Microbiology at University of Louisville Hospital and is a professor of microbiology with the Department of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. Dr. Snyder has over 30 years of experience in all areas of clinical microbiology and serves as a consultant to various state and federal agencies. He is nationally recognized for his expertise in bioterrorism.

Method-Minimum Bacterial Concentration (MBC)

MIC panels were prepared by serially diluting the Microbe Blast compound with a broth diluent in a 96-well microtiter tray. From an initial dilution of 10:1 doubling dilutions were prepared to a final concentration of 1:5120. The organism suspension was prepared by emulsifying the organism in broth and adjusting the concentration until it was equivalent to a 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard (1 x10 8 Colony Forming Units/mL). This concentration was further diluted by pipetting 100mcl into a 25 ml tube of inoculum water yielding a final concentration of 4 x 10 5 CFU/ml. The organism suspension was then pipetted 1:1 into each of the microtiter wells containing the Microbe Blast dilutions. A positive control well containing the organism suspension without Microbe Blast solution and a negative control containing Microbe Blast solution without the organism suspension were prepared in the microtiter tray. The tray was then incubated for 24 hours. All wells demonstrating inhibited growth (no visible turbidity when compared to the controls) were subcultured to a TSA w/5% sheep blood agar plate. The plates were inspected after a 24 hour incubation. From these plates a determination was made regarding the lowest concentration of the Microbe Blast compound that actually killed the test organism (MBC titer). All tests were performed in triplicate to assure reproducibility.

Method-Kill Curve Generation

TSA w/ 5% SB agar plates were labeled for the test organism with and without the Microbe Blast solution for each time interval tested. The organism suspension was prepared by emulsifying the organism in broth and adjusting the concentration until it was equivalent to a 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard (1 x 10 8 Colony Forming Units/ml.) This concentration was further diluted by pipetting 100 mcl into a 25 m; tube of inoculum water yielding a final concentration of 4 x 10 5 CFU/ml. A test solution was then prepared by diluting the Microbe Blast solution in a broth diluent to a concentration equivalent to the MBC of the organism level as determined in the first phase (see above). A negative control was performed using the broth diluent without the Microbe Blast solution. An equal volume of the organism suspension was added to both the test solution and the control and a timer was started. The organism/Microbe Blast solution and the organism broth solutions were both subcultured quantitatively to the TSA w/ 5% SB agar plates that had been labeled earlier at time zero (T0) and then again every ten minutes for the first hour. After the first hour both solutions were left in ambient air at room temperature. With the exception of Campylobacter jejuni all organisms were then incubated at 35⁰C in ambient air for 24 hours. The Campylobacter jejuni was incubated at 35⁰ under microcropilic conditions (10% CO 2 , 5% O 2 ,85% N 2 ) for 48 hours. Following incubation the colonies were counted on all plates and final organism concentrations were calculated. The results of the kill curve were graphed using Microsoft Excel. All tests were done in triplicate to
assure reproducibility.

Organisms Tested

  • Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028
  • Chronobacter muytjensiI strain ATCC 51329
  • Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 13932
  • Escherichia coli ATCC 25922
  • Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 3g3291

Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028

  • Lowest killing dilution 1:20
  • At 1:20 dilution killing was achieved in 10-20 minutes
  • Kill curve never returned indicating a 100% kill

Chronobacter muytjensiI strain ATCC 51329

  • Formerly known as Enterobacter sakazakii
  • Lowest killing dilution 1:40
  • At 1:40 dilution killing was achieved immediately
  • Kill curve never returned indicating 100% kill

Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 13932

  • Lowest killing dilution 1:80
  • At 1:80 dilution killing was achieved in 48 hours
  • The Kill Curves were nearly identical for both a 1:40 and 1:80 dilution, indicating that dosing is not a major factor.
  • Kill curve never returned indicating 100% kill

Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

  • Lowest killing dilution 1:40
  • At 1:40 dilution killing was achieved in 6 hours
  • Kill curve never returned indicating 100% kill

Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 3g3291

  • Unable to determine lowest killing dilution
  • Tested at 1:20
  • At 1:20 dilution killing was achieved in 10 minutes
  • Kill curve never returned indicating 100% kill

study chart

Conclusions

Exposure to the Microbe Blast compound led to a 100% killing over time, indicating that this substance acts more like a disinfectant than an antibiotic. The mechanism of action is yet to be determined.


School of Medicine - University of Louisville - Louisville, KY 40292
P: 502-852-5341 F:502-852-8299 W: Louisville.edu